Two New Attribute Generation Methods

These are two new methods to generate a new character’s attributes. These are optional and a GM may allow them or modify them as they see fit for their games. Both these methods are intended to make the character generation process less random. There are advantages and disadvantages to both. Primarily, the Bonus and Limitations tables are not used for these methods which on average gives a character a 50 point lead in their attributes. This makes the standard random method statistically better but both the new methods allow the player more control over the character creation process.

10d6 Method
The player rolls 10d6. The player then takes the results of those rolls and can decide which d6 goes with what attribute. This may be easier to do with 10 d6 rolled all at once, or the numbers can be noted on a piece of scrap paper as they are rolled and then re-distributed.

For example; the player rolls 10d6 and gets a 1, 3, 6, 4, 3, 5, 5, 1, 4, 2. Normally these are multiplied by ten and assigned in the order of the attributes. In this however the player can decide to rearrange the rolls to 3, 3, 6, 5, 5, 1, 1, 4, 4, 2 and then multiply each value by 10 to better suit the kind of character that the player wants.

Advantage: If the player knows that they want a character with certain proficiencies they can taylor their attributes by assigning dice roll values to those attributes.

Disadvantage: The character cannot roll on Bonus Tables or the Limitations table. They also cannot take any attribute or skill modifiers from the Age or Attitude tables.

Ace Method
The player rolls 3d6 and 1d10. Four attributes are chosen to get assigned these values X10. The other six attributes are given a value of 30 (no rolling, they’re just 30). If the 1d10 rolls a 1 or 2 then the player gets to roll on Bonus Table One twice (GM’s discretion on duplicate rolls).

For example; 3d6 yields 2, 6, 2 and the 1d10 yields a 6 The player has two attributes at 20, six attributes at 30, and two at 60.

Advantage: If the player knows that they want a character with certain proficiencies they can taylor their attributes by assigning dice roll values to those attributes. Also this allows for one attribute to potentially be as high as 100 and on average will be around a 50 instead of a 30 or 40 on a d6 thus the “Ace” designation to this method. Another advantage to this is that even if the player rolls low for their attributes the six attributes at 30 buffer any low results. This is also a very fast method of generating attributes.

Disadvantage: The character cannot roll on Bonus Tables or the Limitations table unless a 1 or 2 is rolled on the 1d10. If a 1 or 2 is rolled, the player gets two rolls on Bonus Table One. They also cannot take any attribute or skill modifiers from the Age or Attitude tables.

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